Evening Training Highs & Hypos

I have always had a lot of trouble maintaining my BGLs when I am training in the afternoon. No matter how much I lower my basal insulin or how many carbs I consume, I always seem to end up having a sharp BGL drop during the session and if not that, then I end up with stomach issues from eating too much before/during the session. The combination of consuming carbs before/during a 1-1.5hr session and also reducing basal insulin, ultimately leads to a spike in BGLs after the session. Adding all of this up it’s 4hrs of worrying about BGLs every afternoon as I prepare, train and then recover.

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Getting levels stable can be very challenging, trying to balance; insulin, carbs and session duration is all important. Sometimes I do manage to get it close enough right though!

Especially with triathlon training where you need to squeeze in swim, ride and run sessions along with strength and recovery, you need to utilise all available sessions which including afternoons/evenings. With my challenges training in the afternoon I try to plan my sessions to get the most important ones in the morning (run and bike) and do other sessions in the evening (strength, swim plus lighter runs/rides). It takes some effort to get my planning right needing to consider; diabetes (am/pm), session requirements (hard/easy/length), pool availability, recovery time between sessions, weather and other personal commitments. Even so, but with a little stress, I manage to get 15 hours of training in most weeks.

So even though it’s a real challenge, I prepare myself most afternoons to head out and complete a training session know full well that there’s a high chance I’ll have a hypo. Recently I have had some success, my BGLs have been fairly stable and I’ve been able to complete some really good afternoon running sessions. The things which I am doing at the moment to give myself the best chance to complete these sessions include:

  • Reduce basal insulin 2 hours before training session and maintain reduced basal for first half of session. I need to reduce my basal rate by 70% for swimming and running session, and 50% for bike sessions in the afternoon. I do not require a reduction for strength sessions.
  • I do not start my session until after 2 hours post reducing my basal insulin rate to ensure that insulin levels in my system are reduced.
  • I try to start my sessions with BGLs around 10.0 mmol/l knowing that they will drop within the first 15 minutes
  • Consume between 20 and 40 grams of carbs about 30 minutes before the start of the session. This will usually be a supplement like Endura Optimizer or Hammer Recoverite mixed with water. I find that I respond well to these carb sources and they do no upset my stomach.
  • During a 1 hour session I will consume 25 grams of carbs at around the 30 minutes and this is usually a sports gel. It is important that whatever I consume does not upset my stomach and I also need to be able to carry it when running. When swimming or riding liquid carb sources are also an option.
  • I check my levels every 15 minutes during the session to make sure my levels are tracking OK and I can adjust things if needed. This does seem like a lot of testing but my levels are drop very quickly and when  you are covering a kilometre in around 4 minutes it can be a long walk home if you’ve missed a hypo!
  • I plan my sessions so that if something does go wrong, most likely a hypo and needing to walk back to the start, I am not too far away. A 20 minute loop is a good option and also provide for keeping provisions in your car for easy access.

I really work hard to get the most out of all of my training sessions and I do get upset when things don’t go to plan. I try to not let these incidents get to me but when you are trying your best and things still go wrong it is challenging to remain positive. Nevertheless, after many many incidents I continue to train and continue to work to get my diabetes management as close to perfect as possible. I know from experience that this will never be possible but the most important thing is to continue to strive to be better and in the end be healthy. Two afternoon run sessions week, one successful and one included a 20 minute walk back to the car in the rain, luckily I’m running first thing in the morning tomorrow!

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Diabetes Sports Project

When I started this blog it was my first real look into the type 1 diabetes community. Although I had been a T1D for over 20 years, like many T1Ds I’d just gone about managing my diabetes on my own and was not interested in reaching out or promoting my diabetes. In 2014 when I got serious about my athletic performance and started researching how to get the best out of myself I found that there was a real lack of resources available for T1Ds on this topic. I started Type1Athletic as a means to note down everything that I was learning through my research and subsequent trials (and errors), and I found many fantastic people, groups and organisations who were trying to do the same thing. This was a really positive experience and helped me in a number of ways.

I came across the Diabetes Sports Project (DSP) when searching the web one day and I instantly felt like I was looking at what I wanted Type1Athletic to be in the future. Through similar experiences to my own and in achieving some amazing race results with T1D the co-founders of DSP, Casey Bowen and Eric Trozer, were showing that having T1D was no hurdle to achieving sporting success. I was not only impressed by the quality of the athletes who were part of the DSP team but also the fantastic public awareness and education that they were doing in America. Working with children and the broader community, and also getting support from some significant companies they were really making a difference for the diabetes community. I felt an instant affinity with the group and contacted them immediately.

DiabetesSportsProject

DSP is led by a group of world class athletes who thrive with diabetes, their stories, athletic accomplishments and community outreach empower other to live healthy, responsible and active lives.

It is truly fantastic when you meet people who have shared very similar experiences and are working towards similar goals as you are. My contact with everyone at DSP has been really positive and I have been introduced to other inspiring T1D athletes from around the world. With technology making it easy to communicate with others across the globe and getting instant updates through social media, being involved in a global network of like minded individuals is nothing but positive.

In July 2016 DSP launched their “Champions” who are everyday T1Ds doing amazing things in their chosen sports and whose stories will provide further inspiration to all T1Ds to not let T1D stop them from achieving their best. I am proud to have been chosen as a DSP Champion and I hope that my experiences can educate and inspire people. Being involved with DSP does not change my attitude to my sport or how I live my life, but I get great motivation from knowing that I might be inspiring someone to achieve their own goals and that others can learn from my experiences. Through the challenges that I have faced I know that it would have been a lot easier if there had been a resources like DSP available to me when I was struggling.

Champions

Diabetes Champions – Stories to educate and inspire

Although DSP is based in America they provide a fantastic resource for all T1Ds worldwide and I highly recommend visiting their website, facebook page and following them through social media on instagram and twitter. I guarantee that having a network of T1Ds will provide you with the information, support and motivation you need to achieve your best.

Diabetes Sports Project: www.diabetessportsproject.com

Team Novo Nordisk

I have been inspired by the Novo Nordisk cycling team since it became a purely type 1 diabetic team. Seeing these cyclists racing at the highest level with type 1 diabetes really showed me that my diabetes was no obstacle to competing in all the endurance events that I wanted to.

Further inspiration this morning through these images of members of the 2016 roster going through a Navy Seal style training camp in California. I’ve sometime thought that I’d make a good Seal, now I know that I can!

Novo Nordisk training on the beach in San Diego, California

I really like the Novo Nordisk messages – Inspire Educate Empower #diabetesempowered #changingdiabetes. I think that these sum up a fantastic message so simply.

Photo’s of the training camp can be found on the Cycling News website.